How Many Teeth Do Horses Have?

Horses’ teeth are one of the most significant parts of their body. If you don’t want your horse to get any serious dental diseases, you should look after this part carefully.

So, the very basic horse teeth question is: How many teeth do horses have?”

Well, let’s find out in detail with us in this article.

How many teeth do horses have?

On average, a horse may have between 36 and 42 teeth. The number of teeth depends on the gender and the age of a horse.

There are many types of horse teeth:

  • Incisors are horses’ front teeth. There are six incisors on both the top and the bottom of a horse’s mouth.
  • Hypsodont are teeth that continue to erupt for up to 30 years from the gum after forming. These teeth form in the jaw of the horse until he is between six and seven years old.
  • The canines teeth are located between the incisor and cheek teeth with two on the top and two on the bottom. Mares are less likely to have canine teeth than stallions.
  • There are four premolars on two sides of the top and bottom. The first premolars are also considered as wolf teeth. Horses usually have their wolf teeth pulled so they can feel more comfortable.

The types of horses teeth

Horses have two sets of teeth in their whole life, just like humans. The baby teeth or deciduous teeth will appear from the time they are born until when they are about eight months of age.

Then, the baby teeth are replaced by adult teeth in the age of 2. At the age of 5, most horses will have a set of permanent teeth. A horse’s permanent teeth are about four inches long.

The uses of horses’ teeth

While horses use incisors to pull grass and pick up food, they use premolars to crush everything before swallowing.

Also, teeth can be used as a weapon. A horse, especially youngsters, may bite hard to protect himself from being attacked by other horses or predators. Teeth are considered as a grooming tool. A horse can scratch an itch or nibble on others’ neck, back, and hindquarters with his teeth.

Some horses even can use their teeth and lips to untie knots in ropes, unfasten door latches, or carry objects around.

Taking care of your horses’ teeth

Like humans, horses need regular dental check-ups and floating horse teeth. Generally, you should take your horses to the dentist once a year. If you don’t really care about your horses’ teeth, they may be prone to several dental problems.

More seriously, these dental problems can lead to poor health, weight loss, behavior and performance problems when driven, which is more difficult to cure.

Therefore, remember to check your horse’s teeth regularly and ask the vet immediately if your horses show any dental symptoms.

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